Stepping out of the journalism box …

By REBECCA LATTANZIO

As journalism students, we have had to sit through plenty of classes that teach us the basics of writing. “Do this, don’t do that,” that’s pretty much what we hear. Rules.

Searching through the web, I stumbled on a website called Committee of Concerned Journalists that had a lot of great tips. I think it’s important to keep our writing interesting, diverse, and different. Even basic outlines and forums like newspapers can include some great articles if the writer is willing to think outside the box. One thing the website really focused on was writing for your readers and not necessarily to make the front cover. It also stressed the importance of being capable of knowing your way around the multimedia world. It’s not an option anymore when it comes to knowing how to work every aspect of a newsroom. They include the need to be versed in photography, text (print), video, video slideshow, graphics, and data.

There are pros to every form of media and which ones you decide to tell your story with are very very important. I’ve had professors that said that text could never be as powerful as video or photo. I definitely don’t agree with that statement, but I do think that visuals or audio can greatly enhance a story. There are so many things that we as aspiring journalists must take into account. It’s not just about writing the who, what, when, why, how, and where anymore. Below, I included a list of 10 quick ways to “reinvent journalism” according to this website and its sources.

So here are 10 things intended to “reinvent journalism,” courtesy of http://howardowens.com:

  • Stop writing for the front page
  • Stop treating journalism like a competition
  • Stop submitting your stories to reporting and writing competitions
  • Listen more closely to your readers
  • Put more people in your stories and fewer titles
  • Don’t cover process
  • Be a subject-matter expert
  • Forget the false-promise of objectivity
  • Be accurate. Always
  • Cover your community like it is your hometown
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