About.com: Infinite online exploration

By JAMIE N. STEPHENS

Claiming the motto Need.Know.Accomplish, About.com offers cyber users an investigative source for information on everyday topics ranging from 15-minute Fashion, Action Figures, Civil Liberties to Ear, Nose and  Throat Disorders, JavaScript and Political Humor, just to name a few.

Example illustration of About.com User Needs such as "a better digital media plan"

With more than 800 sites and 70,000 topics About.com reaches 40 MM average monthly unique visitors in the United States.

“Eighty percent of our users come to About.com from search engines, seeking solutions in response to moments of need,” says About.com.

Essentially, About.com helps users answer the questions to their daily needs and wants including some of the most hard-hitting issues of our society — for instance parenting and healthcare. Here is a video guide that illustrates the ins and outs of about.com: http://www.advertiseonabout.com/.

“About.com continually maintains its relevance to users, consisting of 3.0 million handcrafted, original articles — all created by expert guides; and delivering more than 6,000 pieces of new content each week,” says About.com on its Web site.

To illustrate, the site presents an array of knowledge and insight on the topics of your interest  at the tip of your fingers. Just one type-up or click away on the topic of your choice and About.com navigates you to a designated page  for all the facts, advice, instructions and updated news on your subject. Additionally, the site demographics show that college students comprise 70 percent of its users, which adds to its trending appeal.

About.com notes that “the combined power of trusted expert content and a user-focused site helps the About.com user to efficiently and effectively navigate the “Need. Know. Accomplish” process that arises whenever a need surfaces. For more than 14 years, About.com has been the trusted way for our users to solve the large and small needs of everyday life.”

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