Goodreads.com: Making reading easy

By: SARAH HARTNIG

Although most college students are, for whatever reason, decidedly averted to reading, I was shocked to discover that many of them are indeed enrolled in the School of Communication.

For example, last semester I participated in a news writing course in which the professor required students to perform daily readings of selected sections of The Miami Herald. As the semester continued, so did the groans. At one point, a student even “forgot” about the Winter Olympics. I was dumbfounded, why would students so opposed to reading decide to become journalism majors?

Not wanting to think poorly of my fellow peers, I chalked their lack of enthusiasm up to busy schedules, off-campus jobs and midterms.

However, with that in mind, I believe I have discovered the perfect website for both readers and non-readers alike: http://goodreads.com.

Goodreads essentially combines the thinking behind Google Books, Facebook and Netflix into one, easy-to-use social networking website dedicated to books and readers alike.

Goodreads begins by asking its users to rate the books they’ve read on a scale of one to five. Then, the site actually generates suggestions and creates a sort of cyber-bookshelf for each particular account.

In addition, Goodreads allows their users to develop profiles and to add other members of the Goodreads community as “friends,” not unlike Facebook or other social networking websites. Goodreads even allows its users to follow one another and track what books other members are reading or have recently completed.

But what if you don’t own the book you would to read?

Goodreads provides their users with option to either purchase their book of choice from vendors such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble or to “swap” books with other Goodreads users.

So the next time you find yourself with a bit of down-time, browse the seemingly endless virtual library that is Goodreads and prove that students enrolled in the School of Communication are indeed good readers.

Enjoy!

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